Stroke Stories

Raymond's Story

Nov 10, 2022

“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at RIM.”- Raymond Canion’s Mother


“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at the DMC Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan (RIM),” says Kim Powell.

Nineteen-year-old Raymond “Cheese” Canion was shot in the head during a robbery; the bullet exited his eye.  Kim first got a call that he had died.  Minutes later, the hospital called back and said he was breathing and headed for surgery.

Raymond 
“They removed his eye and part of his skull to relieve pressure.  His odds weren’t good and if he survived, he likely wouldn’t be very high functioning.” 

Cheese survived and a month later, he was transferred to RIM.  Therapists worked to help him sit up, feed himself and do daily activities. When released six weeks later, he could sit in a wheelchair but needed a lift to move from chair to bed.  

“He wasn’t himself cognitively.  Doctors said once they replaced his skull, he would have the best chance at recovery. Four months later, the bone was replaced, and he returned to RIM’s inpatient Neuroscience Unit.

Cheese had daily therapy, and there were signs of improvement almost immediately.  Kim says the therapists were really drawn to him because he always had a big, “cheesy” grin on his face.  They were always there to push and motivate.

“It’s amazing how quickly he started understanding things and then sitting up on his own.  I’ll never forget the day when he took his first step.  I cried.  It was a miracle from God and RIM.”

Cheese continues to receive physical, occupational and speech therapy as an outpatient at RIM. He’s walking on his own and working on improving mobility in his arm.  He hopes to coach football someday.

“I can’t believe how far he’s come in a year, one year!  This is thanks to prayer, his family, daughter and the wonders of RIM.”

Spinal Cord Injury Stories

Raymond's Story

Nov 10, 2022

“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at RIM.”- Raymond Canion’s Mother


“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at the DMC Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan (RIM),” says Kim Powell.

Nineteen-year-old Raymond “Cheese” Canion was shot in the head during a robbery; the bullet exited his eye.  Kim first got a call that he had died.  Minutes later, the hospital called back and said he was breathing and headed for surgery.

Raymond 
“They removed his eye and part of his skull to relieve pressure.  His odds weren’t good and if he survived, he likely wouldn’t be very high functioning.” 

Cheese survived and a month later, he was transferred to RIM.  Therapists worked to help him sit up, feed himself and do daily activities. When released six weeks later, he could sit in a wheelchair but needed a lift to move from chair to bed.  

“He wasn’t himself cognitively.  Doctors said once they replaced his skull, he would have the best chance at recovery. Four months later, the bone was replaced, and he returned to RIM’s inpatient Neuroscience Unit.

Cheese had daily therapy, and there were signs of improvement almost immediately.  Kim says the therapists were really drawn to him because he always had a big, “cheesy” grin on his face.  They were always there to push and motivate.

“It’s amazing how quickly he started understanding things and then sitting up on his own.  I’ll never forget the day when he took his first step.  I cried.  It was a miracle from God and RIM.”

Cheese continues to receive physical, occupational and speech therapy as an outpatient at RIM. He’s walking on his own and working on improving mobility in his arm.  He hopes to coach football someday.

“I can’t believe how far he’s come in a year, one year!  This is thanks to prayer, his family, daughter and the wonders of RIM.”

Brain Injury Stories

Raymond's Story

Nov 10, 2022

“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at RIM.”- Raymond Canion’s Mother


“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at the DMC Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan (RIM),” says Kim Powell.

Nineteen-year-old Raymond “Cheese” Canion was shot in the head during a robbery; the bullet exited his eye.  Kim first got a call that he had died.  Minutes later, the hospital called back and said he was breathing and headed for surgery.

Raymond 
“They removed his eye and part of his skull to relieve pressure.  His odds weren’t good and if he survived, he likely wouldn’t be very high functioning.” 

Cheese survived and a month later, he was transferred to RIM.  Therapists worked to help him sit up, feed himself and do daily activities. When released six weeks later, he could sit in a wheelchair but needed a lift to move from chair to bed.  

“He wasn’t himself cognitively.  Doctors said once they replaced his skull, he would have the best chance at recovery. Four months later, the bone was replaced, and he returned to RIM’s inpatient Neuroscience Unit.

Cheese had daily therapy, and there were signs of improvement almost immediately.  Kim says the therapists were really drawn to him because he always had a big, “cheesy” grin on his face.  They were always there to push and motivate.

“It’s amazing how quickly he started understanding things and then sitting up on his own.  I’ll never forget the day when he took his first step.  I cried.  It was a miracle from God and RIM.”

Cheese continues to receive physical, occupational and speech therapy as an outpatient at RIM. He’s walking on his own and working on improving mobility in his arm.  He hopes to coach football someday.

“I can’t believe how far he’s come in a year, one year!  This is thanks to prayer, his family, daughter and the wonders of RIM.”

Orthopedic Stories

Raymond's Story

Nov 10, 2022

“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at RIM.”- Raymond Canion’s Mother


“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at the DMC Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan (RIM),” says Kim Powell.

Nineteen-year-old Raymond “Cheese” Canion was shot in the head during a robbery; the bullet exited his eye.  Kim first got a call that he had died.  Minutes later, the hospital called back and said he was breathing and headed for surgery.

Raymond 
“They removed his eye and part of his skull to relieve pressure.  His odds weren’t good and if he survived, he likely wouldn’t be very high functioning.” 

Cheese survived and a month later, he was transferred to RIM.  Therapists worked to help him sit up, feed himself and do daily activities. When released six weeks later, he could sit in a wheelchair but needed a lift to move from chair to bed.  

“He wasn’t himself cognitively.  Doctors said once they replaced his skull, he would have the best chance at recovery. Four months later, the bone was replaced, and he returned to RIM’s inpatient Neuroscience Unit.

Cheese had daily therapy, and there were signs of improvement almost immediately.  Kim says the therapists were really drawn to him because he always had a big, “cheesy” grin on his face.  They were always there to push and motivate.

“It’s amazing how quickly he started understanding things and then sitting up on his own.  I’ll never forget the day when he took his first step.  I cried.  It was a miracle from God and RIM.”

Cheese continues to receive physical, occupational and speech therapy as an outpatient at RIM. He’s walking on his own and working on improving mobility in his arm.  He hopes to coach football someday.

“I can’t believe how far he’s come in a year, one year!  This is thanks to prayer, his family, daughter and the wonders of RIM.”

Sports Medicine Stories

Raymond's Story

Nov 10, 2022

“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at RIM.”- Raymond Canion’s Mother


“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at the DMC Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan (RIM),” says Kim Powell.

Nineteen-year-old Raymond “Cheese” Canion was shot in the head during a robbery; the bullet exited his eye.  Kim first got a call that he had died.  Minutes later, the hospital called back and said he was breathing and headed for surgery.

Raymond 
“They removed his eye and part of his skull to relieve pressure.  His odds weren’t good and if he survived, he likely wouldn’t be very high functioning.” 

Cheese survived and a month later, he was transferred to RIM.  Therapists worked to help him sit up, feed himself and do daily activities. When released six weeks later, he could sit in a wheelchair but needed a lift to move from chair to bed.  

“He wasn’t himself cognitively.  Doctors said once they replaced his skull, he would have the best chance at recovery. Four months later, the bone was replaced, and he returned to RIM’s inpatient Neuroscience Unit.

Cheese had daily therapy, and there were signs of improvement almost immediately.  Kim says the therapists were really drawn to him because he always had a big, “cheesy” grin on his face.  They were always there to push and motivate.

“It’s amazing how quickly he started understanding things and then sitting up on his own.  I’ll never forget the day when he took his first step.  I cried.  It was a miracle from God and RIM.”

Cheese continues to receive physical, occupational and speech therapy as an outpatient at RIM. He’s walking on his own and working on improving mobility in his arm.  He hopes to coach football someday.

“I can’t believe how far he’s come in a year, one year!  This is thanks to prayer, his family, daughter and the wonders of RIM.”

Amputee Stories

Raymond's Story

Nov 10, 2022

“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at RIM.”- Raymond Canion’s Mother


“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at the DMC Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan (RIM),” says Kim Powell.

Nineteen-year-old Raymond “Cheese” Canion was shot in the head during a robbery; the bullet exited his eye.  Kim first got a call that he had died.  Minutes later, the hospital called back and said he was breathing and headed for surgery.

Raymond 
“They removed his eye and part of his skull to relieve pressure.  His odds weren’t good and if he survived, he likely wouldn’t be very high functioning.” 

Cheese survived and a month later, he was transferred to RIM.  Therapists worked to help him sit up, feed himself and do daily activities. When released six weeks later, he could sit in a wheelchair but needed a lift to move from chair to bed.  

“He wasn’t himself cognitively.  Doctors said once they replaced his skull, he would have the best chance at recovery. Four months later, the bone was replaced, and he returned to RIM’s inpatient Neuroscience Unit.

Cheese had daily therapy, and there were signs of improvement almost immediately.  Kim says the therapists were really drawn to him because he always had a big, “cheesy” grin on his face.  They were always there to push and motivate.

“It’s amazing how quickly he started understanding things and then sitting up on his own.  I’ll never forget the day when he took his first step.  I cried.  It was a miracle from God and RIM.”

Cheese continues to receive physical, occupational and speech therapy as an outpatient at RIM. He’s walking on his own and working on improving mobility in his arm.  He hopes to coach football someday.

“I can’t believe how far he’s come in a year, one year!  This is thanks to prayer, his family, daughter and the wonders of RIM.”

Cardiac Rehab Stories

Raymond's Story

Nov 10, 2022

“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at RIM.”- Raymond Canion’s Mother


“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at the DMC Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan (RIM),” says Kim Powell.

Nineteen-year-old Raymond “Cheese” Canion was shot in the head during a robbery; the bullet exited his eye.  Kim first got a call that he had died.  Minutes later, the hospital called back and said he was breathing and headed for surgery.

Raymond 
“They removed his eye and part of his skull to relieve pressure.  His odds weren’t good and if he survived, he likely wouldn’t be very high functioning.” 

Cheese survived and a month later, he was transferred to RIM.  Therapists worked to help him sit up, feed himself and do daily activities. When released six weeks later, he could sit in a wheelchair but needed a lift to move from chair to bed.  

“He wasn’t himself cognitively.  Doctors said once they replaced his skull, he would have the best chance at recovery. Four months later, the bone was replaced, and he returned to RIM’s inpatient Neuroscience Unit.

Cheese had daily therapy, and there were signs of improvement almost immediately.  Kim says the therapists were really drawn to him because he always had a big, “cheesy” grin on his face.  They were always there to push and motivate.

“It’s amazing how quickly he started understanding things and then sitting up on his own.  I’ll never forget the day when he took his first step.  I cried.  It was a miracle from God and RIM.”

Cheese continues to receive physical, occupational and speech therapy as an outpatient at RIM. He’s walking on his own and working on improving mobility in his arm.  He hopes to coach football someday.

“I can’t believe how far he’s come in a year, one year!  This is thanks to prayer, his family, daughter and the wonders of RIM.”

Parkinson's Disease

Raymond's Story

Nov 10, 2022

“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at RIM.”- Raymond Canion’s Mother


“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at the DMC Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan (RIM),” says Kim Powell.

Nineteen-year-old Raymond “Cheese” Canion was shot in the head during a robbery; the bullet exited his eye.  Kim first got a call that he had died.  Minutes later, the hospital called back and said he was breathing and headed for surgery.

Raymond 
“They removed his eye and part of his skull to relieve pressure.  His odds weren’t good and if he survived, he likely wouldn’t be very high functioning.” 

Cheese survived and a month later, he was transferred to RIM.  Therapists worked to help him sit up, feed himself and do daily activities. When released six weeks later, he could sit in a wheelchair but needed a lift to move from chair to bed.  

“He wasn’t himself cognitively.  Doctors said once they replaced his skull, he would have the best chance at recovery. Four months later, the bone was replaced, and he returned to RIM’s inpatient Neuroscience Unit.

Cheese had daily therapy, and there were signs of improvement almost immediately.  Kim says the therapists were really drawn to him because he always had a big, “cheesy” grin on his face.  They were always there to push and motivate.

“It’s amazing how quickly he started understanding things and then sitting up on his own.  I’ll never forget the day when he took his first step.  I cried.  It was a miracle from God and RIM.”

Cheese continues to receive physical, occupational and speech therapy as an outpatient at RIM. He’s walking on his own and working on improving mobility in his arm.  He hopes to coach football someday.

“I can’t believe how far he’s come in a year, one year!  This is thanks to prayer, his family, daughter and the wonders of RIM.”

Archived Stories

Raymond's Story

Nov 10, 2022

“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at RIM.”- Raymond Canion’s Mother


“My son is proof that God puts the right people in your life, like the therapists at the DMC Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan (RIM),” says Kim Powell.

Nineteen-year-old Raymond “Cheese” Canion was shot in the head during a robbery; the bullet exited his eye.  Kim first got a call that he had died.  Minutes later, the hospital called back and said he was breathing and headed for surgery.

Raymond 
“They removed his eye and part of his skull to relieve pressure.  His odds weren’t good and if he survived, he likely wouldn’t be very high functioning.” 

Cheese survived and a month later, he was transferred to RIM.  Therapists worked to help him sit up, feed himself and do daily activities. When released six weeks later, he could sit in a wheelchair but needed a lift to move from chair to bed.  

“He wasn’t himself cognitively.  Doctors said once they replaced his skull, he would have the best chance at recovery. Four months later, the bone was replaced, and he returned to RIM’s inpatient Neuroscience Unit.

Cheese had daily therapy, and there were signs of improvement almost immediately.  Kim says the therapists were really drawn to him because he always had a big, “cheesy” grin on his face.  They were always there to push and motivate.

“It’s amazing how quickly he started understanding things and then sitting up on his own.  I’ll never forget the day when he took his first step.  I cried.  It was a miracle from God and RIM.”

Cheese continues to receive physical, occupational and speech therapy as an outpatient at RIM. He’s walking on his own and working on improving mobility in his arm.  He hopes to coach football someday.

“I can’t believe how far he’s come in a year, one year!  This is thanks to prayer, his family, daughter and the wonders of RIM.”