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We are committed to providing a website that is accessible to the widest possible audience. To do so, we are actively working with consultants to update the website by increasing its accessibility and usability by persons who use assistive technologies such as automated tools, keyboard-only navigation, and screen readers.

We are working to have the website conform to the relevant standards of the Section 508 Web Accessibility Standards developed by the United States Access Board, as well as the World Wide Web Consortium's (W3C) Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.1. These standards and guidelines explain how to make web content more accessible for people with disabilities. We believe that conformance with these standards and guidelines will help make the website more user friendly for all people.

Our efforts are ongoing. While we strive to have the website adhere to these guidelines and standards, it is not always possible to do so in all areas of the website. If, at any time, you have specific questions or concerns about the accessibility of any particular webpage, please contact WebsiteAccess@tenethealth.com so that we may be of assistance.

Thank you. We hope you enjoy using our website.

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12 Ways to Prevent Lower Back Pain

Lower back pain can interrupt your quality of life, whether it’s a chronic, dull ache or a sharp sudden stab. Taking steps to prevent lower back pain can help you avoid injuries that may take a long time to heal.

Doing these 12 things may help lessen your risk of lower back pain:


1. Stretch before working out.

2. Avoid standing for long periods.

3. Avoid wearing high heels.

4. Look for lower back support when sitting for several hours.

5. Sleep on your side with knees bent.

6. Observe proper posture when lifting objects.

7. If an object is too heavy for you to carry, ask for help.

8. Lose excess weight. It puts a strain on joints and skeletal structure.

9. Don’t stress.

10. Practice yoga or pilates.

11. Stay active, but don’t overdo it.

12. Quit smoking to lower your risk of osteoporosis.

WHEN TO SEE A DOCTOR

If something happens and you have pain that gets worse or doesn’t improve within two to three weeks, book an appointment with your doctor. Other reasons to call your doctor include:


Intense pain that makes it difficult to move

Pain caused by an injury, such as a car accident

Difficulty going to the bathroom

Nausea or vomiting

Fever or chills

Numbness in your groin, rectum, leg or foot

Pain that shoots down your leg below your knee

A doctor may help you manage the pain to get better or provide a treatment plan for ongoing pain.

Your safe care is our #1 priority.

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