Meet Our Faculty

Robin Hanks, Ph.D., ABPP-ABCN is the Chief of Rehabilitation Psychology & Neuropsychology at the Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan and is also the Director of Training for the predoctoral and postdoctoral training program in Clinical Neuropsychology. She is a Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in the Wayne State University School of Medicine and an Adjunct Professor of Psychology in the Wayne State University School of Science. She received her Ph.D. in 1996 from the Department of Psychology at Wayne State University, completed her APA approved internship at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Physical Medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, WA.

Dr. Hanks leads the outpatient clinical neuropsychology rotation at the downtown (main campus) and has research interests in the areas of traumatic brain injury; neuropsychological assessment; emotional adjustment post brain injury; long-term cognitive and functional outcome in rehabilitation populations.

 
 
Stephen Vangel, Ph.D. provides neuropsychological and psychological services at the downtown (main campus) and Novi campus. Dr. Vangel obtained his Ph.D. from Wayne State University in 1996 and completed his APA approved internship at the John Dingell V.A. Hospital in Detroit. He is an Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Wayne State University School of Medicine.

Dr. Vangel is also a "behavioral specialist" at the Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan. Dr. Vangel's clinical and research interests are in the areas of behavioral factors in injury recovery and disability, factors affecting interdisciplinary team functioning, family adjustment to trauma, and validity and clinical utility of neuropsychological tests.

 
Norman Fichtenberg, Ph.D., provides neuropsychological services at the Novi Center, an outpatient clinic of Rehabilitation Institutes of Michigan that specializes in adult neurological disorders, particularly traumatic brain injury. These services primarily involve neuropsychological evaluations covering a variety of diagnositic categories. He is also an Assistant Professor in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in the Wayne State University School of Medicine. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Detroit in 1990.
Dr. Fichtenberg's research interests include patterns of neuropsychological performance by persons with brain injury, clinical validation of neuropsychological instruments in the assessment of brain injury, differential diagnosis in cases of mild head trauma, and methods for determining the validity of neuropsychological data.
 
Thomas J. Gola, Ph.D., is a staff neuropsychologist for the neuroscience and PM&R service at the Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan and an assistant professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Wayne State University School of Medicine. He is also a co-investigator with the SEMTBIS project. Dr. Gola received his Ph.D. from Wayne State University in 1994. He has published in the area of effort assessment, traumatic brain injury, and dementia. In addition to neuropsychology, Dr. Gola has wide experience in Behavior Analysis and Therapy. He has a special interest in behavior management of chronic pain. Dr. Gola has been involved with the forensic aspects of neuropsychology and traumatic brain injury. His current research interests lie with advancing neuropsychological assessment in the differential diagnosis of dementia and the ecological validity of common neuropsychological measures.
 
Brigid Waldron-Perrine, Ph.D., is the primary provider of neuropsychological and psychological services at the RIM Sterling Heights campus and also provides outpatient services at the downtown campus. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Wayne State University School of Medicine, and currently serves as the Associate Director of Training for the department’s postdoctoral training program in Clinical Neuropsychology. Dr. Waldron-Perrine graduated with her doctorate from Wayne State University in 2010 after completing an APA approved internship at the John D. Dingell VA Medical Center in Detroit, MI. She then completed an APPCN post-doctoral fellowship in clinical neuropsychology at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System/University of Michigan. Dr. Waldron-Perrine’s research interests are in the areas of cognitive and emotional rehabilitation from neurological injury (e.g., influences of coping approaches/positive emotionality and contextualized rehabilitation), neuropsychological correlates of hypertension, neuropsychological assessment in patients with medical conditions, and assessment and treatment of veterans with polytrauma.
 
Tanya E. Sherman, Ph.D., is a staff neuropsychologist providing neuropsychological and psychological services at the RIM Detroit campus. Dr. Sherman graduated with her doctorate from Wayne State University (WSU) in 2004 after completing an APA approved internship at the Ann Arbor VA Medical Center. She then completed post-doctoral training in clinical neuropsychology at the Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan. She has previously been on faculty as an assistant professor in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Departments at WSU Medical School and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dr. Sherman’s research interests are in the areas of multiple sclerosis, including awareness of deficit, patient and caregiver quality of life, and neuropsychological aspects of acquired brain injury.
 
Kimberly L. Peters, Psy.D., is the attending psychologist for the Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Unit at the Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan. Prior to joining the faculty there, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Rehabilitation Psychology and Neuropsychology within the University of Michigan Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. She completed her predoctoral internship at the Canandaigua VA Medical Center. She received her Psy.D. from Roosevelt University-Chicago in 2012. Dr. Peters leads the inpatient SCI rotation at the downtown campus. In addition to her role on the inpatient unit, she also provides outpatient psychotherapy services. Her clinical and research interests include factors related to individual and family adjustment to traumatic injury, the treatment of mood disorders in medically complex patients, pain management strategies, and adaptive cognitive assessment for persons with altered fine motor and/or language abilities.